The Room And What Makes A Movie Good Or Bad

n0HThe Room is a hard movie to explain to someone who hasn’t seen it. The plot seems simple to sum up; a mans fiance falls out of love with him and begins an affair with his best friend ultimately leading to tragedy. However, if you watch it you’ll realize that describing The Room with that sentence is like describing The Tree of Life as a movie about a family in Texas. The plot of The Room meanders and at times disappears completely, the acting varies from atrocious to merely bad, the dialogue is bad, the cinematography is uninspired, and there is some truly bad green screen. I’ve seen it with friends who have left in the middle to go do something else, and a few people have told me that they can’t understand why I would watch it. The Room is often described as the worst movie ever made or the best worst movie, and yet I find myself watching it over and over.

I’ve seen The Room more than any other movie, or at least more than I can remember seeing any other movie. I’ve seen it alone on a laptop, with friends on a TV, and in theaters on the screen. It’s a movie I find myself returning to constantly and thinking about at random moments. It’s because of that I find it hard to mark The Room down as simply a “bad movie”. It’s one of my favorite movies, and I watch it because I genuinely enjoy the experience, even removed from the social aspect of watching it with friends or in a theater where people yell out lines and jeer. I find something new to think about or analyze every time I see it. I have impassioned discussions with my other friends who enjoy the movie where we talk about The Room and I’ve had more than a couple of conversations with people about it at parties. Maybe all this means is that I have way too much affection towards what amounts to a poorly made movie and yet I can’t shake the feeling that there’s more too it than that. Maybe I don’t think that The Room is “so bad it’s good”, maybe I just think that it’s only good.

maxresdefault (2)

It’s not hard to explain to people why I think The Room is a good movie,I essentially laid it out in the previous paragraph. I find new things to think about in every viewing, it’s memorable, it provokes discussion with people, and at it’s most basic level I just plain like it and enjoy watching it. No, for me the more interesting question isn’t why is The Room good, it’s why isn’t The Room bad?

It’s an interesting question because it forces me to think about what makes a movie, any movie, bad? Some people view bad as the absence of good, I disagree. I find that when a movie lacks anything good it is far more likely to be mediocre and forgettable rather than bad. It’s a fine line, and one that I think is quite blurry but for me a mediocre movie doesn’t make me feel anything while a bad one causes a visceral emotional reaction. I thought Thor: The Dark World was mediocre and I thought Suicide Squad was bad. I thought this about those movies because when I left the theater after Thor I couldn’t and still can’t remember what happened in it, and when I think about or talk about Suicide Squad I still strongly feel distaste towards it.

Natalie Portman Chris Hemsworth

So if a lack of good isn’t what makes a movie bad, than what is it? I don’t think that it’s the opposite of good either, there are plenty of movies that I think aren’t rewatchable, or enjoyable to watch that I wouldn’t call bad, and some I would even call good. I don’t think there is an objective way to categorize a movie as good or bad. Going by a critical consensus will inevitably cause you to come into conflict with the consensus, I didn’t like The Grand Budapest Hotel and think it’s Wes Anderson’s worst movie despite the consensus being the other way. People will point to plot holes and other nitpicking gotcha aspects in an attempt to prove a film is bad due to logic and reason. They’ll point to things like the 180 degree rule and say that if a movie breaks this rule it is bad. I disagree with this there are many films that break every rule of film making or screenwriting that are phenomenal. There are films that are abstract, movies that deal in dream logic or even no logic at all, some that have no interest in narrative or even in being a movie. Is it right to judge films that don’t aspire to conform to our definition of a movie the same way we judge a blockbuster movie?

There is no objective way to judge a film because there is no objective way to view a film. Each one of us has to navigate each film without a set of criteria to help guide us. All we have to go on are our experiences, our biases, our cultural background, the ideas, mores, and emotions that have shaped us as people working subconsciously to shape our view on a film. I think that’s why I feel so strongly about this because to me how I feel about a movies says as much about myself as it does the film, and I suspect the same is true for most people. So for me to say why a movie is bad is to say why I think that I think that a movie is bad, and I think I’ve figured it out.

TheGrandBudapestHotel_Trailer1

A bad movie makes me angry. Not at the story being told on-screen, but at the film itself. I’m not saying that means that if your remember your watching a movie its a bad movies, some of the best movies deliberately break your immersion and point out that what you’re watching is a film. No, what I mean is that the film provokes anger outside of the context that the film presents. If you get angry at a character making a wrong choice in a movie that is result of the narrative the film presents. However if you’re watching a movie and you begin to feel anger towards the film itself well you might just be watching a bad movie. Only a few movies have ever made me feel this way, a select group of movies that were incomprehensible, offensive, or took something that shaped me and made a mockery of it. The rest of the films I haven’t enjoyed fall into the aforementioned mediocre category or a category of films that can best be described as “not good”, that is to say movies that are memorable, and yet can’t be said to be either good or bad because they didn’t provoke a strong emotion.

This means fundamentally that for a film to be good it must cause us to feel something. Whether that be joy or sadness, a good movie makes you feel something within the context of the film. This is why I think The Room is a good movie because within the world that the film presents I feel joy, it makes me happy. It’s far too rare a movie that can do that, and even rarer the film that can do it over and over again. Maybe you don’t agree with me and you watch The Room and think it is a bad movie. Maybe you think that all I’ve written makes no sense and maybe that’s true. In the end this is only how I feel. Watch as many movies as you can, watch movies that have been critically panned and praised, movies that are abstract or arty, movies that are mainstream and experimental, and find what makes you like or dislike a movie. Maybe you’ll learn a little bit about yourself as well.

 

Advertisements

Why I Love Movies.

hugo-movie-theater

Writing an essay about loving movies isn’t very original, I’m pretty sure there are hundreds of essays online with this exact same title. So consider this just one more leaf on the pile, one more essay talking about the joy and emotion that come out of the world of film. You can also look at this a sort of mission statement for this site, for how I look at movie and art in general. At it’s core reviewing art is trying to put into words the gut feeling we get when that art is consumed, its not a science. I know how I feel about art, even if that feeling is not knowing how I feel about it, reviewing is filling in the why. To understand my reviews and to see where I’m coming from when I write them, I think it’s important to know my connection to the medium. Specifically here I’m going to write about film, mostly because it’s the one I write the most about and because it’s my favorite.

I think everyone has a movie, usually that they saw at a young age, that was “the movie”. The one that made them stay up at night thinking about what they saw. The one where something clicked in their mind and made them want to see every movie they could. For me that movie was Garden State, Zach Braff’s 2004 ode to sad, quirky, awkward, white dudes everywhere. Perhaps in retrospect it isn’t that good but from the moment younger me saw the movie I was hooked. There was something about Garden State that made it the right movie at the right time, something about it that made me feel something that I don’t think I had felt before. I think it was longing, longing for a world that didn’t exist, that you could only reach through this film. So it stayed with me.

Garden-State

I haven’t watched Garden State in years, I don’t know if I would even like it now, but I do remember the way it made me feel the first time I saw it. It isn’t my favorite movie anymore, as the years have gone by and I’ve seen more films I’ve replaced it with movies I think are better. Every single one of those films has made me feel something, not the same thing I felt with Garden State but each unique in the emotions and memories they elicit. But a movie doesn’t have to be my favorite to have and impact. Ultimately I think there are three reasons why I continue to love movies. First, movies are entertaining, they’re cool, they’re fun and they provide an escape from our lives. Second, movies widen the world, they expose us to new ideas, and they create new universes to explore. Finally, I believe that film is a unique medium that provides that is the best at making us feel.

I think the entertainment values of movies is something we all take for granted, but it isn’t one we talk enough about. Yes, movies are an art form, and many movies are made for the sole purpose of being artistic. It’s a noble goal, and one I support. But, at least in the United States, the majority of movies people will see were created with the purpose of entertaining people. This can take a variety of forms, from an action film such as Speed to a murder mystery movie like Murder On The Orient Express. There’s something fun and relaxing about leaving your current situation behind and melting into the symphony of action or the story of whatever your watching. Creating good entertainment, the kind people will want to revisit, isn’t easy, and it is something to be admired when that is created.

For me, perhaps the genre that best exemplifies this is action. Now of course action movies can tell us about the society we live in or makes think about new ideas, in fact the very best ones do but at their heart I believe that action movies are about giving us thrills. There’s a lot to admire about a movie like Die Hard, the way it’s expertly plotted, the acting, but what I like the most about it is just how much fun it is. Maybe that’s a weird thing to say about a movie about a terrorists taking over an office building but it really is fun to watch a movie about a hero taking on a group of bad guys. We want him to succeed, we root for him, we marvel at the explosions and stunts, and we’re happy when at the end the good guy wins. There’s something beautiful in the action of these films, something incredible about the way they take us into a fantasy where these things can happen.

McClane-hanging-from-a-fire-hose-Die-Hard

In their own way, every movie creates its own world. It’s sort of an intrinsic fact of creating a film, that by having a camera and showing things on it that it becomes a world of its own. In creating these new worlds movies bring us new things to think about, new ideas, and introduce to cultures that aren’t our own. I think that’s a beautiful thing about movies, that they can tell me a story about someone who’s life, upbringing, and culture are different from mine and that I am able to see it from their perspective.

In this thread are documentary films that allow people to be exposed to new ideas and to have realities revealed to them. There’s something about being shown real moments and real events that make documentary films such a rewarding experience. In this vein we also have films that push new ideas through fiction. In particular those that combine this with new worlds to create places that people may truly want to inhabit.

There’s something clichéd about wanting to live in a science fiction or fantasy world. I think it’s because it’s something everyone has dreamed about, few people imagine themselves living in the crime-ridden world of The Godfather, people may want to be the main character or observe their world from the safety of their home but not live in them. However, who hasn’t dreamed of living in the world of Star Trek, going to Hogwarts, or even the Hollywood high schools of the 80’s. Movies allow us to create new universes and in doing so allow us to dream of them.

transamerica-pyramid-2258-stxi

In the end I feel that the greatest strength of film is this, films are the best catalyst for allowing us to access and magnify those memories, moments, and emotions that live deep in the back of our mind. When the sound, images, editing, and acting that make up a movie come together in just the right way they help us to experience emotions we may not have thought about in a long time. I think every good movie does this, accesses some forgotten part of our brain and make us feel in a way that other mediums just don’t.

Let’s take something as simple as the first time you kiss someone. I’m sure most people could explain to someone the way they felt the first time they kissed someone, whether they were nervous or excited, confident or shy, and when they did it how it was. If you read a passage of a book about a first kiss maybe that might remind you of that moment. A song might play that brings back that memory, and yet for me all of those only bring back the memory, not the emotion.

But when I watch the “Kiss the Girl” sequence from The Little Mermaid there’s something about the combination of the song, the visuals, and the whole film making package that does more than just bring back the memory. It makes me feel like I did the first time I kissed someone. Of course that was years ago so I don’t really remember exactly the way I felt, only that it was some mixture of fear, excitement, nervousness, adrenaline, and joy. However watching that part of The Little Mermaid makes me feel the way I feel that I felt during my first kiss.

maxresdefault (1)

The best movies make us feel this way, in a vague, hard to describe, they make us feel the way we imagine we do about things we imagine about. That is the real power of film, helping us to draw the emotions we store away and don’t think about. Movies can do so much, entertain, give us new worlds, but at end, at their core, movies are like all the best works of art. They work as lenses, lenses that focus the deeply human emotions we all feel and project them on a screen for us to marvel at.